Big Agnes Support

DIY Pad Repairs

Stay Off The Ground.

Sleeping pad leaks in the backcountry can deflate any trip (no pun intended). Master these DIY pad repairs and you'll be ready for the worst.

How To Locate A Leak

The first thing you want to do is locate the leak. Inflate the pad and submerge it in a tub of water (a bathtub or swimming pool works well). Fold your fully inflated pad in half (so a 72” pad becomes 36”). Now fold the top half back on itself creating a “z” shape on one half. Submerge the unfolded half of the pad under water. Lean on the folded half with your elbow and check for any streams of bubbles. Press down hard on the pad to force air through any leaks. You will need to unfold and refold to check the head and foot of the pad as well as the top side and bottom side.

If you find a small puncture (identified by a single steady stream of bubbles) mark it with a piece of chalk or masking tape. Let the pad dry and then deflate it.

If you are unable to find the source of the leak or are not sure how to repair it, please fill out our Online Claim Form.

How To Patch a Pad

All of our air chamber pads come pre-supplied with self-adhesive patches - keep them! If you need more, reach out to us and we'll send you some free of charge. If you don't have any of our patches handy and are looking for a quick fix, Tenacious Tape makes a great patch!

Air Chamber Pads

  1. Locate the leak. If you have trouble finding it, try submerging the inflated pad in water and look for bubbles.
  2. Choose the appropriate patch size which will extend beyond the edges of the puncture.
  3. Deflate pad and clean the surface around the puncture. Pad should be warm and dry before affixing the patch.
  4. Peel and stick the repair patch. Do Not Iron.
  5. Smooth entire patch to eliminate air bubbles. Press firmly to help adhesive hold. Let cure 5 minutes.
  6. Inflate the pad and check the repairs.

Q-Core Deluxe / Boundary Deluxe

Your pad is made of 2 different materials. We have provided 2 patch types to use depending on the material. The valve side is made of a stretch material and the bottom is made of a non-stretch material. It is essential to use the correct patch and attachment method for the material.

Bottom of pad - Non-stretch material

Note: Use the 3M peal and stick, self-adhering patches for the bottom of your pad. Do Not Iron.

  1. Locate the leak. If you have trouble finding it, try submerging the inflated pad in water and look for bubbles.
  2. Choose the appropriate patch size which will extend beyond the edges of the puncture.
  3. Deflate pad and clean the surface around the puncture. Pad should be warm and dry before affixing the patch.
  4. Peel and stick the repair patch. Do Not Iron.
  5. Smooth entire patch to eliminate air bubbles. Press firmly to help adhesive hold. Let cure 5 minutes.
  6. Inflate the pad and check the repairs.

Valve side of pad - Stretch material

Note: Use the patches with the clear shiny coating on the back for the valve side of your pad.

  1. Locate the leak. If you have trouble finding it, try submerging the inflated pad in water and look for bubbles.
  2. Choose the appropriate patch size which will extend beyond the edges of the puncture.
  3. Deflate pad and clean the surface around the puncture. Pad should be warm and dry before affixing the patch.
  4. To affix to the patch, use an iron heated to 140-160℃/ 285-320F, medium heat or polyester setting.
  5. Position the patch on the pad and press it with iron for 30-60 seconds until the patch is firmly attached to the fabric.
  6. Remove iron and allow to cool.
  7. Inflate the pad and check the repairs.

Hinman, Two Track, Captain Comfort

Your self-inflating pad does not include a patch kit. For repairing punctures, slashes and abrasions we recommend applying SeamGrip sealant by Gear Aid or Tenacious Tape. Before you patch your pad, make sure it is clean and bone dry. If you use liquid sealant, allow it to dry fully (typically 3 hours) prior to using. Test your pad by inflating it and either sleeping on it or putting weight on it overnight (stacks of books or backpacks work well).

How To Replace a Flange (Red Membrane)

What is the Valve Flange?

The red, silicone membrane included with your pad patch kit is called the valve flange. It forms a seal against your inflation valve allowing for air micro-adjustment and preventing backflow as you inflate your pad.

Instructions

1. Open both valve caps on the pad and let all of the air out.

2. Press down on the top of the valve flange to create separation and grab the edge of the flange through the bottom material of the pad.

3. Pinch the valve flange through the pad material and pull it free from the valve.

4. Remove the valve flange through the open deflator valve.

5. Insert the new valve flange through the deflator valve with the stem oriented up towards the inflator valve.

6. Align the stem through the opening, and pull it through until it snaps into place. You may choose to clip off the excess stem for easier inflating.

Toujours bloqué ?

Contactez notre équipe d'assistance en créant un dossier d'assistance ou en nous appelant au 877.554.8975.

Nos heures d'ouverture sont les suivantes :

Lundi-Jeudi 10h-16h
Vendredi 10h-13h

Toutes les heures sont exprimées en heure de la montagne.

Ouvrir un dossier


Plus d'articles sur le soutien